YouTube does its bit to help Nonprofits!

Is your nonprofit using YouTube? If not, you should be!

The success of the ALS Ice Bucket challenge highlighted – among many things – the power of social media to help nonprofit fundraising. YouTube gets more than 1 billion unique users each month and, according to Nielsen, YouTube reaches more US adults aged 18-34 than any cable network.

What this means is that YouTube represents a great avenue for nonprofits to spread their message. There’s even a published playbook that the company has put out in order to help nonprofits make the most of the video channel.

And to help make it even easier to turn views into donations they’ve added this handy donate button seen below in a snapshot of The Nature Conservancy’s YouTube page.

Technology is making it easier and easier for nonprofits to connect to the masses and generate small gifts. Of course connections to the masses aren’t enough – but advances in technology have also produced relationship mapping services, such as Prospect Visual, which allow nonprofits to connect with the more niche groups of high capacity, potential major gift donors.

Nature Conservancy

$4.26m to Taylor University shows the power of alumni

While perusing through the news reports today we came across this interesting item about a donation to Taylor University in eastern Indiana. The gift – a generous $4.26 million – came not from a single donor but from a group of alumni celebrating their 50-year reunion.

The university explained that the group had been planning to make this gift as a result of alumnus Ron Scott’s challenge to his classmates from 1964 to make a memorable gift to their former school to celebrate their reunion. Though Scott passed away last year, his peers took up his challenge and came through with their generous gift.

We think this is a heartwarming story that proves that the connection between graduates and their alma mater is very strong and – given the right set of circumstances – can be a powerful aid to any institution’s fundraising.